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4evah 4eyes.

I've been a life long dork, in case you hadn't noticed. But I've always felt like something's been missing from my stereotype....

Glasses.

And, finally, I'm gonna get some. In a couple weeks, I'll be complete. I just don't know if I can wait that long.


I am a class 5 nerd. Whatever that means. Most people seem to realize that within the first 5 minutes of talking to me. I make up for it, I hope, with humor.

But something's been missing my whole life, something I've yearned for, needed in order to feel complete.

So when the optometrist told me "You're pretty much destined to wear glasses.", my heart skipped a beat, and I readily replied "Awesome!".

I've always known I was a little near sighted, but apparently that's not even the main problem for me. I have astigmatism in both eyes--meaning the lens are imperfectly shaped, distorting the focal points and my vision overall.

My glasses will compensate for this without a problem. Only thing is, everything's going to look a little...odd for the first couple of days while my brain "adapts" to seeing good. This is normal, and not in itself a problem. All I have to do is stick it out--keep wearing the glasses until I've adjusted.

Funny thing, though, is if I stop wearing my glasses after my brain's figured itself out, I'll have the reverse side of that experience. Everything will look weird again as my brain tries to re-adapt to trying to see without them glasses.

So basically, "destined to wear glasses" :D


I'm not even sure why I'm so excited. I mean, obviously I need to come off as even cooler and smarter than I already am; 5 minutes is way too long for people to realize this when they meet me. Also, I'm simply not cool or smart enough seeming on my, naturally. Glasses are for cool kids, see.

I've also been frustrated recently as I've realized all the things I have trouble seeing that everyone hasn't a problem with. Things that shouldn't be hard to make out, like signs in subway stations or billboards. Those sort of things that are supposed to be readable, even from a distance.

And now I'm more excited than ever. You know how at the end of the session, the doctor guy puts together a bunch of lenses on a lil faux-glasses thing and puts it over your eyes to make sure the prescription will look, right?

My first response when he did that--"Holy shit, the world exists!" So much detail. Lines and shapes everywhere.

Sure, I was always aware of all that, at least generally. I'm not that blind. Things have always had shapes and lines and stuff. But I never knew how much sharper, clearer, crisper they could be. I've probably had this astigmatism my whole life, distorting my vision the entire while.

And now I'm jonesing for it, man. I need my fix--my vision fix. The world was just so addictively clearer. More won't be enough. It's like I've never really seen the world before (which I guess I hadn't) and now I'm hooked on it.

But now I've got to wait 2 weeks for Zenni Optical to send them to me. Grr! I want them now! :D


I don't think I'll have any trouble getting through that "odd" adapting phase. I might have trouble remembering to take off my glasses more than anything. And I'm definitely cool with that.

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