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Ah, sweet memories.

So guess what watched the other day?

No, not bad movies. Although, yes, I've watched 2 new ones this week, at least one of which you can expect a review of sooner than later. Hopefully.

No, the other night I ended up watching Wallace and Gromit in The Wrong Trousers. I'd almost forgotten about those guys. It was so good--the reunion and the film itself.

I was surprised how actually funny it was; I'm not sure but I may even have found it funnier today than when I was a kid. Those facial expressions--Gromit's especially--just killed me. Not to mention the feel-goody excitement--like when Feathers McGraw is using Wallace to steal that diamond (how the fuck do they get us to root for the bad guy!? :D) or the chase scene at the end (I want that box of spare tracks).

I only watched the first three films when I was a kid. I kinda grew up on them. Watching this one brought back the memories and feelings of being a kid, the good ones too.

But I still haven't seen the other two Wallace & Gromit films--The Curse of the Were-Rabbit or A Matter of Loaf and Death. I guess I thought I'd outgrown these guys by the time those came out. I guess it turns out I haven't, and don't know if I ever will by the looks of it. So, for better or for worse, I suppose I should really look into those other two movies, shouldn't I? :)

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