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Homeward and onward.

This was a wonderful trip. At leaat a full day too short for my liking, but rewarding and wonderful all the same.

I had worried at parts that I would disappoint somebody. Like Mani by not really sitting down and catching up, or the friends I was meeting up with being indecisive or overpaced & underplanned, or Parker by leaving him behind with Mani yesterday.

But it actually turned out pretty alright. Parker had a blast palling about with Mani and his friends, and hanging out with one of my friends ended coincidingly with when my other friend wanted to hang.

And everyone, it seems, came away happy. Parker got experience parts of New York he didn't back when his family used to live here. Mani got to enjoy (? :-P) hosting a pair of nutballs for the weekend. I got caught up with two really awesome guys I could totally see working closely with or otherwise keeping in much better touch with.

Revisiting this old town, the memories it holds; taking some ownership and reliving a sliver of the life I used to lead here (the better slivers, of course); was more than just a bit thrilling, too.

But I'm going home now, and I'm feeling pretty upbeat. Between the goodconversation stimulating conversation, the memories old and new, and time spent musing, I feel so motivated and even ready to 'kick ass and take names'.

I'm really excited to head home, though. I'm excited to write and draft and finish projects. I'm looking forward to keeping up with these friends and collaborating and brainstorming and everything.

One thing that's strikes me oddly is how little envy or anger I feel. Normally I might be all kindsa caught up with how much closer everyone else is in the pursuit of their dreams. But if this trip's reminded me of anything, it's that what's passed is passed, and life moves on. So, instead, I feel ready to move forward with my own life, to learn and to grow and change. To start building the rest of my life in my own world, in my own home--right here in DC, the strange lovely little town I love and've chosen to call my home.

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